Posted by & filed under Introduction To Psychology, Lecture Enhancement/Student Engagement, Psychology Update, Psychology Website of the Week, Ted Talk.

PSYCHOLOGY WEBSITE OF THE WEEK

TITLE

TED Ed Lessons Worth Sharing

URL      

http://ed.ted.com/search?utf8=%E2%9C%93&qs=psychology#tededlessons

(Tiny Url)  http://tinyurl.com/zjprsnh

 

DESCRIPTION

“TED-Ed Original lessons feature the words and ideas of educators brought to life by professional animators.”

We all know about TED talks, but did you know that some professors have developed lessons around these presentations.  The link will take you to the site of the collected Psychology TED Talks that have lessons built around them.  These are worth exploring and useful for class preparation and lectures.

Posted by & filed under Brain Structure and Function, Introduction To Psychology, Nervous System, Psychology Update, Psychology Video of the Week.

TITLE

How Your Brain Makes Its Own Electricity – YouTube

 

DESCRIPTION

This is a fabulous YouTube video (approximately 20 minutes) that takes you into the inner workings of the brain and nervous system, and it’s a pure delight!.   The video describes and illustrates how the neurons operate with wonderful animations and actual views inside the cells themselves.  Also, there is a brief history of the types of research that has demonstrated the discoveries of the mystery of the nervous system.  Taking the time to watch the video will bring the chapters on the brain and nervous system to life — totally engaging.

 

SOURCE

YouTube Video by Patreon

 

LINK TO RESOURCE

(Tiny URL)  https://tinyurl.com/2ujd6eae

 

CLASS DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:

•After watching the video, explain how the brain makes its own electricity as state in the title.

•The video describes, as an example, stubbing one’s toe.  How is the information transmitted to the brain in terms of both touch sensation and pain sensation?

•If you were going to do a lecture on the history of the research into the nervous system, what would you emphasize as the important information for your peers to understand?

 

Posted by & filed under Introduction To Psychology, Personality, Psychology Update, Psychology Website of the Week, Stress and Health Psychology.

WEBSITE OF THE WEEK

TITLE

Positive Psychology Center

URL      

https://ppc.sas.upenn.edu/

DESCRIPTION

This is Martin Seligman’s webpage at the University of Pennsylvania.  It discusses the concept and perspective of Positive Psychology providing resources for students interested in the field, research, and scholarly references.

Posted by & filed under Brain Structure and Function, Cognitive Psychology, Introduction To Psychology, Nervous System, Psychological Disorders and Therapy, Psychology Update, Sensation and Perception, Stress and Health Psychology.

3 ARTICLES ON THE LONG TERM PSYCHOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF COVID-19

Though Covid-19 has been at one extreme life threatening and for some more fortunate, a mild infection, there are a number of reported post viral Psychological effects.  The three articles examine different aspects of the Psychological effects.

 

ARTICLE #1

TITLE

COVID-19 May Be Linked to Spontaneous Psychosis

 

DESCRIPTION

There are a number of cases of psychosis, though rare, that have been found in people who have experienced Covid-19 (coronavirus).  The symptoms included disorganized thought, delusions, hallucinations, and other signs along the schizophrenic spectrum  “There’s growing evidence that COVID-19 and new psychotic episodes are connected. The North Carolina case, reported in the British Medical Journal (active link) in August 2020, joins a slew of case reports published in medical journals during the pandemic that detail psychotic episodes following a COVID-19 diagnosis. In the July 2020 issue of BJPsyh Open, researchers reported that a 55-year old woman in the U.K., with no history of mental illness, arrived at a hospital days after recovering from a severe case of COVID-19 with delusions and hallucinations, convinced that the nurses were devils in disguise and that monkeys were jumping out of the doctors’ medical bags.”  The article discusses a number of journal articles that have appeared that discuss cases of spontaneous psychosis after the covid infection.  The article further presents a number of important hypotheses regarding how the virus might cause the psychosis but none are definitive at this time.  Further, the article points out that the available evidence is “muddy” in that it is more association than cause and effect.  The available data is more in the line of collected anecdotal evidence derived from case studies.   It is worth reading to see how the researchers have begun to isolate the causes of the psychotic episodes as related to the Covid-19.

 

SOURCE

TIME, March 4, 2022, by Jeffrey Kluger

 

LINK TO RESOURCE

https://time.com/6153809/covid-19-psychosis-symptoms/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=email-share-article&utm-term=health_covid-19

 

(Tiny URL)  https://tinyurl.com/2p9dfb7f

 

===============================

ARTICLE #2

 

TITLE

Covid May Cause Changes in the Brain, New Study Finds

 

DESCRIPTION

In another series of studies, researchers found changes in brain matter  and related cognitive decline after individuals had experienced Covid-19 (coronavirus) infections.  “Covid-19 may cause greater loss of gray matter and tissue damage in the brain than naturally occurs in people who have not been infected with the virus, a large new study found. (active link) The study, published Monday in the journal Nature, is believed to be the first involving people who underwent brain scans both before they contracted Covid and months after.”  Further “The study, involving people aged 51 to 81, found shrinkage and tissue damage primarily in brain areas related to sense of smell; some of those areas are also involved in other brain functions, the researchers said.”  This study like the others in this update speculate and hypothesize about how the Covid-19 virus affects the brain and causes the  psychological related problems.  Those interested in the brain and nervous system will find this very fascinating.  Those who are not interested in the anatomy and physiological aspects would find the psychological factors (sensation/perception/cognition) engaging and more compelling.

 

SOURCE

New York Times, March 7, 2022, by Pa Bullock

 

LINK TO RESOURCE

https://www.nytimes.com/2022/03/07/health/covid-brain-changes.html?smid=em-share

 

(Tiny URL)  https://tinyurl.com/3eatde5f

 

===============================

 

ARTICLE #3

TITLE

How does COVID-19 cause people to lose sense of smell? And how many regain it?

 

DESCRIPTION

One of the defining symptoms of Covid-19 has been the loss of the sensation of smell or anosmia.  The loss has been found to be either acute (lasting a few weeks) to chronic (very long lasting or permanent).  “Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, perhaps no symptom has been in the spotlight more than loss of smell.  Estimates vary, but it’s believed that as many as 96% of COVID-19 patients experience some or total loss — but it’s usually temporary. Most regain the sensation within weeks.  Studies have suggested that anosmia, the medical term of the condition, is a better predictor of whether someone has the virus than other symptoms such as cough or fever.  Researchers still don’t fully understand how the virus causes loss of smell, but there are a few theories.”  The article and brief video hypothesize the causes of the anosmia though the research has not been able to definitively pinpoint the exact reasons.   Further this article discusses the types of therapies that have evolved to help those who have lost the sense of smell — fascinating!!!

 

SOURCE

ABC News, January 23, 2022, by Mary Kekatos  

 

LINK TO RESOURCE

https://abcnews.go.com/Health/covid-19-people-lose-sense-smell-regain/story?id=82353411

 

(Tiny URL)  https://tinyurl.com/y4dhzfws

 

===============================

CLASS DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:

•What are some of the symptoms in post Covid-19 individuals that psychologists would find of interest?  Please enumerate the problems.

•Many covid-19 patients lose their sense of smell.  What is this called?  What do the researchers believe causes the loss?  Describe the type of therapy involved in retraining the sense.

•Research into the aftermath of Covid-19 has found that a small number of people experience a temporary psychotic break.  What are the symptoms of “psychosis” as studied by Psychology?  What has been hypothesized as the cause?

 

Posted by & filed under Introduction To Psychology, Psychology Podcast of the Week.

PSYCHOLOGY PODCAST OF THE WEEK

Psychology in Every Day Life: The Psych Files


(click on the title above to be directed to the iTunes preview for more information)

Britt_Psych_Files

DESCRIPTION

From iTunes Store

“The Psych Files is a podcast for anyone interested in the topic of psychology and how ideas in the field apply to everyday life.  Dr. Michael Britt brings you an upbeat, fun podcast of interest to everyone from psychology majors to those just interested in why people do what they do.”

HOW TO USE THIS PODCAST

Both the professor and students can download the app to their device or listen online through the iTunes store.  Like his website, Dr Britt weaves Psychology concepts into “every day life” examples.  The videos are entertaining and enriching and takes basic concepts from simple understanding to higher level application and integration cognitively for learning.

 

Bill Britt posted the last of his fabulous podcasts in February 2020.  All of this podcasts of the past are wonderful.  So rather than lose the link, it is listed here as a resource for both students and educators.

Posted by & filed under Brain Structure and Function, Careers, Introduction To Psychology, Nervous System, Psychology Update, Stress and Health Psychology.

TITLE

Spinal Stimulation Device Helps Paralyzed Patients Walk, Cycle and Swim

 

DESCRIPTION

This is an important article that will provide a great deal of hope for those people who have experienced a spinal cord injury.  “To perform an action like walking, the brain sends a message to our muscles in the form of electricity that tells the legs to move. But after a complete spinal cord injury, the brain’s signals can’t reach the nerves, resulting in paralysis. By using electrical stimulation from electrodes, doctors were able to send similar electrical signals to the body that the brain normally would, like “sit,” “stand,” or “walk.”  The flexible electrodes, which sit between the spinal nerves and vertebrae, are controlled with the touch of a tablet screen. The patient or doctor can then control pulses that activate muscles in the trunk and legs, according to the study published in the journal Nature Medicine. Depending on the electrode stimulation pattern, the signals translate to specific muscle activities, like getting up from a chair or riding a bike.”

There are a number of branches of medicine that include psychologists as part of the teams that work with individuals who have suffered serious injuries especially of the brain and spinal cord.  The knowledge that psychologists have developed about the “normal” functioning has been integrated into the medical aspects of recovery from these types of traumatic injuries.  The knowledge comprises an understanding of the brain functions, neurons, spinal cord, and nerve transmission.   Also, in the long term, the individual’s would need to work through psychotherapy to deal with their trauma.  The article has a link (included above) to the medical journal that provides the information about the rehabilitation and several important diagrams of the nervous system and spinal cord.

 

SOURCE

Smithsonian, February 9, 2022, by Corryn Wetzel

 

LINK TO RESOURCE

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/spinal-stimulation-device-helps-paralyzed-patients-walk-cycle-and-swim-180979548/?utm_source=smithsoniandaily&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=20220209-daily-responsive&spMailingID=46376091&spUserID=NzQwNDU3MDAyMDIS1&spJobID=2181091396&spReportId=MjE4MTA5MTM5NgS2undefined

 

(Tiny URL)  https://tinyurl.com/ytaf7tas

 

CLASS DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:

•What is a spinal cord injury?  What are the consequences?

•Explain the “normal” sequence of neural events that enable us to both experience sensations and also to make voluntary movements?

•Specifically, how does this rehabilitation work for the injured person?   

•What type of contribution to the rehabilitation can a psychologist make?

 

Posted by & filed under Introduction To Psychology, Psychology App of the Week.

PSYCHOLOGY APP OF THE WEEK

 

APA Citation Generator

 

 

Available for both iOS & Android   ($2.99 for full version)

iOS: https://apps.apple.com/us/app/citation-generator-lite/id899062445

 

Android

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.J_G.apa_generator&hl=en

 

DESCRIPTION

APA Citation Generator helps create in-text citations and references for American Psychological Association (APA) Format 6th edition essays.

==================
FEATURES
==================
• Download APA Format Template
• Includes 3 in-text citations and reference generators (citation machine). Supports Books, Software, and Website sources.
• Share in-text citations and references via E-mail.

HOW DOES THIS BENEFIT ME?
===========================
APA Generator benefits students of all ages with experience or not. The facts are APA format citations and references are structured in such ways that makes it hard to memorize for each and every different type of media. APA Generator creates the references and citations for you while you just focus on writing your essay.

If your not sure how to setup a word document that is compliance for APA format. Simply download our template word document where you simply fill in the blanks and are ready to start writing your essay on the spot.

APA Format essays made simple.

Posted by & filed under Introduction To Psychology, Personality, Psychological Disorders and Therapy, Psychology Update, Psychology Video of the Week, Stress and Health Psychology.

TITLE

Reliving Trauma Through Virtual Reality is Helping Veterans With PTSD

 

DESCRIPTION

This link is to a 2-minute video that discusses and briefly demonstrates the use of Virtual Reality therapy as a tool to help veterans with PTSD.  “Soldiers who experienced combat trauma have a new way of getting help — walking through a virtual reality simulation of their experience. Deana Mitchell (narrator) spoke to a psychologist about how it works.”

This brief video demonstrates a new technique to supplement “talk therapy” to enable the veteran to begin to experience relief after combat and subsequent PTSD.

 

SOURCE

VOA News, January 25, 2022, by Deana Mitchell

 

LINK TO RESOURCE

https://www.voanews.com/a/reliving-trauma-through-virtual-reality-is-helping-veterans-with-ptsd/6411600.html

 

(Tiny URL)  https://tinyurl.com/2p9dmnph

 

CLASS DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:

•What is PTSD?  Is it only veterans who experience PTSD or others who have experienced trauma?

•How does virtual realty (VR) work for the reduction of PTSD symptoms?

•Why does the interviewed psychologist recommend cautions in working with PTSD trauma victims?

 

Posted by & filed under Careers, Careers in Psychology, Introduction To Psychology, Psychology Update, Psychology Website of the Week.

PSYCHOLOGY WEBSITE OF THE WEEK

TITLE

Dr. Kit Nast:  Psychology — Educational/Career Website

URL  

    

http://www.drkit.org/psychology

DESCRIPTION

This is a fabulous website that will help your students with career questions and will be a great resource for teaching.

from Dr Kit Nast:

“I’m pleased to announce that I have recently relaunched my educational/career website. Specifically, my updated psychology page may be of great use to you and your students” – 

www.drkit.org/psychology <http://www.drkit.org/psychology>

“This information will help to get the students into the field and will assist in helping undergraduate students to find appropriate graduate programs.  In addition, I’m looking for students and faculty in some of your programs who can be featured on the website.  Not only are these great resources, but they also may provide for some free marketing for your program.”

Thank you!

Dr. Kit

Psychology Instructor

Bishop State Community College

 

Posted by & filed under Introduction To Psychology, Personality, Psychology Update, Stress and Health Psychology.

TITLE

How to Build Resilience in Hard Times

 

DESCRIPTION

What an important article by the fabulous science writer of the NY Times Jane E. Brody!  In this article she addresses the difficulties that people go through in their lives including the current continuing pandemic.   How individuals cope in hard times is the focus of the article.   Coping is an important psychological trait that is has to be cultivated and learned over time as we grow and develop.  Once important aspect of coping is the theme of the article:  RESILIENCE.  

“One way is to call upon an age-old characteristic that enables us to weather adversity: resilience. Resilience is the ability to roll with the punches, “because if you’re brittle, you’ll break,” said Pauline Boss, professor emeritus at the University of Minnesota and author of the recently published book, “The Myth of Closure.” … “Resilience allows us to adapt to stress and maintain one’s equilibrium when faced with adversity. “When resilient people are confronted with a crisis that takes away their ability to control their lives, they find something they can control,” Dr. Boss said.”  The article discusses how resilience develops as a personality trait and further, and most importantly, provides the lessons to develop the trait.   

This article can be used with text chapters related to development, stress and health, and personality.

 

SOURCE

New York Times, January 31, 2022, by Jane E. Brody

 

LINK TO RESOURCE

https://www.nytimes.com/2022/01/31/well/mind/building-resilience-loss.html?smid=em-share

 

(Tiny URL)  https://tinyurl.com/2p82kx2d

 

CLASS DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:

•What is “resilience” according to the article?

•Are we born with the resilience trait or does it develop over time?   Explain and provide examples.

•What guidelines are listed in the article to help cope and build resilience?