Posted by & filed under Introduction To Psychology, Lecture Enhancement/Student Engagement, Psychology Website of the Week.

PSYCHOLOGY WEBSITE OF THE WEEK

NAME

85 Great Tech Resources for Psychology Students

URL:  https://www.online-psychology-degrees.org/85-great-tech-resources-for-psychology-students/

Tiny Url:    https://tinyurl.com/v7dcwd2


DESCRIPTION

This site is like a Swiss Army Knife!  Students can explore a variety of useful resources that include apps, websites, writing utilities, groups, forums, project ideas and so on.  It is worth exploring.

From the website:

“The goal of this guide is to outline the best technological “must-haves” for students of psychology and to highlight some of the most cutting edge technology to help students succeed academically, socially and professionally. While some resources will be more relevant for students at the undergraduate or graduate level, all students will find these tools an important part of the academic process.”

Table of Contents:

Chapter 1: Websites

Chapter 2: Apps

Chapter 3: Blogs

Chapter 4: Forums / Groups

Chapter 5: Online Organizations

Chapter 6: Online Text and Publication Services

Chapter 7: Research Resources

Chapter 8: Test Preparation and Study Aids

Chapter 9: Online Paper Writing Resources

Chapter 10: Additional Resources

Posted by & filed under Introduction To Psychology, Lecture Enhancement/Student Engagement, Psychology Update, Social Psychology.

PSYCHOLOGY WEBSITE OF THE WEEK

Why Norms Matter | Psychology Today

DESCRIPTION

Why Norms Matter

Both historical and present-day examples show us the power of social influence.

From the website, written by Dr. Sanderson:

“I’m delighted to be writing a blog about the power of social influence. As a professor, I teach and conduct research about social norms, meaning the unwritten rules that shape our behavior. But on a more personal note, I see the power of social norms all around us in everyday life — from what we choose to share or not share on social media to whether we step up or stay silent when we witness bad behavior.

 

 

I’ll be sharing a post every other Monday. Here are a few of the topics I look forward to addressing in the weeks/months/years ahead:

  • How norms influence eating and exercise behavior, including research I’ve published with my students showing that women often misperceive other women as eating less and exercising more than they themselves do – and the consequences of such perceptions on rates of disordered eating behaviors.
  • Why bad behavior – from bullying to sexual assault to fraternity hazing – persists even when most people in a community don’t approve of such behavior, but (falsely) believe that others do.
  • How we can push prosocial behaviors of all types – from reusing towels in a hotel to increasing voter turnout – by telling people that others support such behaviors.

SOURCE

Psychology Today, current, Catherine A. Sanderson Ph.D.

 

LINK TO RESOURCE

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/norms-matter

 

(Tiny URL) https://tinyurl.com/y2qa8vob

 

FOR CLASS DISCUSSION

•Please check the site regularly for each new topic.  Both the professor and students will find this as a wonderful resource for understanding human behavior.

 

Posted by & filed under Introduction To Psychology, Lecture Enhancement/Student Engagement, Psychology Update.

WELCOME STATEMENT

Welcome to  Wiley Introductory Psychology Weekly Updates

Every Monday through June you will find wonderful resources to enhance your learning, teaching and to engage  in discussions.   With each “published” edition, you will discover two or three interesting provocative articles to use as “triggers” to discuss important issues that relate to your learning as a Psychology student, and for the professor teaching content, subject matter, and/or important issues.  The choice of the articles is such that students can find these on popular sites such as the New York Times, Time Magazine, Huffington Post, and read them without the pressure of going to the library or poring through their textbook.  The popular media choices are easy to find without the need for subscription services; these are often articles that you might have read and brought up in your class.   Further, the update will include a few questions that can be used to get a discussion started.

In addition to a listing of the articles, you will also be presented with a few websites for use in your classes, as well as personal and professional use.  The websites can be useful informative resources for both your classes and personal life.  Lastly, every week, you will find either an App Of The Week listing, occasionally YouTube video, or a Podcast that will both enhance learning, teaching and presentations.   If you have any suggestions please contact me.   

Thank you,

David Berg

 

Posted by & filed under Psychological Disorders and Therapy, Psychology Update, Social Psychology, Stress and Health Psychology.

TITLE

For Some, a Second Pandemic Winter Means Seasonal Affective Disorder Is Hitting Hard

 

DESCRIPTION

This interesting article is focused upon the diagnosis of Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) during the now 2-year length of the pandemic and how it has affected those with the affliction.  The article begins by discussing a case of an individual who experiences anxiety and depression and who is sensitive to the issue and who has experienced an increase in the SAD.  The article quotes a psychiatrist familiar with the issue.  “Luana Marques, an associate professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, says she’s seeing similar trends among her patients. If last year’s primary challenge was isolation, this year’s is uncertainty, Marques says. As the pandemic drags on and new variants emerge, many people are afraid of what that could mean for the winter ahead—especially when, post-vaccine rollout, they’d envisioned spending the season around friends and family. That’s colliding in an unfortunate way with SAD, which is defined as depression that follows a seasonal pattern for at least two consecutive years….It’s logical to think the pandemic would worsen that situation, given that many people are spending more time at home and socializing less than ever—effectively doing the opposite of what experts typically recommend for avoiding SAD.”  The article makes simple easy to follow recommendations which include going outside and trying to increase social contacts.  Further, “Pre-pandemic tools for fighting SAD still apply as well. There is some evidence that exposure to light therapy lamps can help, and some people have luck with vitamin D supplements. Mental health professionals can also provide extra support.”

 

SOURCE

Time, December 23, 2021, by Jamie Ducharme

 

LINK TO RESOURCE

https://time.com/6128820/pandemic-seasonal-affective-disorder/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=email-share-article&utm-term=health_mental-health

 

(Tiny URL)  https://tinyurl.com/45ubzbdt

 

CLASS DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:

•What is Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD)?  How is it diagnosed?  Is it different than other types of depression?

•According to the psychiatrist quoted in the article, how has the pandemic affected those with SAD?

•What are the recommendations for coping with SAD?

 

Posted by & filed under Brain Structure and Function, Nervous System, Psychological Disorders and Therapy, Psychology Update.

TITLE

New traumatic brain injury test is ‘game-changing,’ concussion experts say

There are millions of TBI hospitalizations and deaths each year.

 

DESCRIPTION

What is Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)?  “TBI is a disruption in normal brain function caused by a blow or jolt to the head. A concussion is the mildest form of TBI, but patients may suffer a constellation of physical, cognitive, emotional and sleep symptoms. Some of the most common signs include confusion, headaches, blurry or double vision, dizziness, fatigue, memory loss, difficulties with concentration and insomnia.”  The usual way to diagnose concussion is by subjective self-report, CT and MRI scans, and clinical judgement.  According to the article, there can be a great deal of inaccuracies in the diagnosis until now.“In a world first, a newly authorized handheld device will allow doctors to detect traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) in under 15 minutes, potentially saving lives by dramatically shortening the time it takes to properly diagnose the issue.The device is made by Abbott, a medical device company based in the United States… This is a huge milestone that has never been done before — a blood test for the brain,” said Dr. Beth McQuiston, medical director for Abbott’s diagnostic businesses.”  By the way, imagine how this test can be hugely helpful for high school, college, and professional sports wherein players are frequently hurt and often their concussions are either not diagnosed properly or misdiagnosed entirely.   This is a real boon to understanding the brain and the affects of TBI.

 

SOURCE

ABC News, January 11, 2021, by Dr. Mishal Reja and Dr. Leah Croll

 

LINK TO RESOURCE

https://abcn.ws/3oCw3Gu

 

CLASS DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:

•What is Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)?  What are the causes and symptoms?

•Up until this new test, how have concussions and TBI been diagnosed?  What have been the problems with getting an accurate diagnosis?

•What is the new test for TBI?  How is it administered?  How does it aid diagnosis and what are the advantages of using this new test?

 

Posted by & filed under Brain Structure and Function, Nervous System, Psychological Disorders and Therapy, Psychology Update, Research Methods, States of Consciousness & Sleep.

TITLE

Can Monitoring Brain Waves Boost Mental Health?

Neurofeedback has promised a mental health revolution for decades. But is it effective?

 

DESCRIPTION

This is a fascinating article regarding the practice of a relatively new type of treatment:  Neurofeedback.  “The treatment is known as neurofeedback, a therapy some say can improve our attention, moods, sleeping habits and even our athletic ability by measuring brain activity and showing it to us — either on a screen or through headphones — in real time. A practitioner places electrodes on a patient’s head that detects (but does not stimulate) brain activity. This is then analyzed by a computer that sends it back to the patient as images or sounds. As the patient completes tasks, the computer encourages healthy patterns of brain activity.”  The article presents several examples in the form of cases that demonstrate how the treatment is used and the believed effectiveness of the therapy.  However, the article points out, and rightly so, the criticisms by skeptical researchers regarding the types of outcome studies.  This is an excellent article that speaks to a new type of therapy and also how researchers suggest the use of the scientific method to validate the true effectiveness of the therapy.

 

SOURCE

New York Times, January 12, 2022, by David Dodge

 

LINK TO RESOURCE

https://www.nytimes.com/2022/01/12/well/mind/neurofeedback-therapy-mental-health.html?smid=em-share

 

(Tiny URL)  https://tinyurl.com/4wctrv3t

 

CLASS DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:

•What is Neurofeedback?  What is the procedure used for a patient?

•For what types of problems do Neurofeedback therapists claim that the therapy can be helpful?

•Why are many therapists and researchers skeptical about the evidence for use of Neurofeedback?

•From a research standpoint, what methodology do researchers recommend to actually validate the effectiveness of Neurofeedback therapy?

 

Posted by & filed under Introduction To Psychology, Lecture Enhancement/Student Engagement, Psychology App of the Week, Psychology Update.

 

FOR YOUR ONLINE LEARNING — THIS IS A MUST HAVE FOR YOUR SMART PHONE, TABLET, AND COMPUTER.  GET A FREE ACCOUNT AND START USING IMMEDIATELY!

Psychology APP OF THE WEEK

Evernote and Evernote WebClipper
(free version available on ALL platforms for both computers and mobile devices)

Evernote                                                 Evernote Web Clipper

  evernote                         Evernote_webclipper_logo

“The workspace of your life’s work.  From inspiration to achievement, Evernote is where your work takes shape. Write, collect, find, and present, all from one workspace.”

 

https://evernote.com/basic

 

Are you using Evernote?  Shame on you if you are not!  Overall this is one of the best and most useful applications available for your life as an academic and student for that matter.   Simply sign up at the Evernote site (evernote.com) and get a free account.  A premium account is available that provides more bells and whistles but not necessary.   Once you sign up for an account on your computer (Mac and PC), get the app for your tablet and smartphone; Evernote is available on all mobile platforms — iOS and Google.  Once you have the app, then just log on and you’re set to go.

To describe all of what Evernote does in this space would be a difficult task.  However, the way I use it is combined with an associated app:  Evernote WebClipper.  You can follow the directions at the Evernote site to download and add WebClipper to your internet browser as a tiny icon in the menu bar.

Imagine that you’re reading an article online from a newspaper, journal, APA publication, or for that matter, anything at all.  Suppose that you want to save the article for later use such as citation, handout, later reading, and so on.  Well just click on the Evernote WebClipper icon in the browser menu bar, and suddenly you will see a pop up  window that gives you options to store in your Evernote account.   Just click and the article is saved in either its entirety, as a title and URL, or just a selection.  You can then find the article in your Evernote account for later use such as printing it out, reading, setting up a bibliography or a repository of reference materials.  Yes there are other apps that can do this, however, there are many add-ons for your mobile device (Tablet for teaching and reading) that integrate with Evernote.  EverNote has a number of other add ons that include note taking apps, scanning apps.  Go to the site and check it out.

 

EverNote has a number of other add ons that include note taking apps, scanning apps,   Check out this Evernote Tutorial:

https://help.evernote.com/hc/en-us/articles/208314458-Quick-start

 

Posted by & filed under Introduction To Psychology, Nervous System, Psychology Update, States of Consciousness.

3 ARTICLES REGARDING UNUSUAL SLEEP PATTERNS/EXPERIENCES

 

ARTICLE #1

TITLE

Exploding head syndrome: What to know

 

DESCRIPTION

Parasomnias are issues related to disturbed sleep patterns and may include night terrors, sleep walking and talking, as well as sleep eating.  Another unusual parasomnia as been labeled “Exploding Head Syndrome.”  From the article:  “Exploding head syndrome is a sleep disorder that causes people to hear loud noises when they transition in or out of deep sleep.  Although hearing loud noises can cause distress, panic, or fear in some people, exploding head syndrome is not a severe or life threatening condition. However, it can interfere with a person’s sleep, which may lead to excessive daytime fatigue.  Exploding head syndrome is a type of sleep disorder that belongs to a group called parasomnias. These cause unwanted physical, verbal, or behavioral symptoms during sleep transitions.”  The article discusses causes, symptoms, and treatments.  The article can be used along with the chapter on Sleep and Dreaming.

 

SOURCE

Medical News Today, March 5, 2020, by Jamie Eske

 

LINK TO RESOURCE

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/exploding-head-syndrome

 

(Tiny URL) https://tinyurl.com/y3896yba

 

================================================

ARTICLE #2

 

TITLE

Insomnia and Vivid Dreams on the Rise With COVID-19 Anxiety

 

DESCRIPTION

With the increasing time of the lock down due to the pandemic more and more are people experiencing anxiety and negative emotions during their waking hours, experiencing insomnia, and having bad dreams (REM activity) during sleep.  “The Lyon Neuroscience Research Center study has found a 35 percent increase in dream recall and a 15 percent increase in negative dreams. For people not on the front lines of healthcare and emergency response, fears of the novel coronavirus are projected onto threats like zombies, bugs, and shadowy figures, which represent the pandemic metaphorically, per National Geographic.”  The article provides several examples of the types of dreams reported by the researchers.   This article can be used to accompany the textbook chapters on sleep and dreams.

 

SOURCE

Smithsonian, April 23, 2020, by Three Machemer

 

LINK TO RESOURCE

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/insomnia-and-vivid-dreams-rise-pandemic-anxiety-180974726/?utm_source=smithsoniandaily&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=20200423-daily-responsive&spMailingID=42342156&spUserID=NzQwNDU3MDAyMDIS1&spJobID=1742516608&spReportId=MTc0MjUxNjYwOAS2

 

(Tiny URL)  https://tinyurl.com/yxhj455u

 

================================================

 

ARTICLE #3

TITLE

What Is Hypnic Jerk? Here’s What’s Behind the Sleep Problem

 

DESCRIPTION

An unusual occurrence during sleep is the sudden “hypnic jerk” phenomenon.  “If you’ve ever found yourself drifting off to sleep only to be woken by a vigorous, full-body twitch or jerk, then do not feel alarmed. You’re among the estimated 60-70% of Americans who regularly experience a phenomenon known as a hypnic jerk—also known as a hypnagogic jerk, or sleep start—which strikes as a person falls into a deep sleep… Hypnic jerks—involuntary twitches or jolts which occur during the night—can affect people in different ways. Many people will sleep right through them, but for others, they are vigorous enough to wake them up.”  The article discusses circadian rhythm patterns and possible causes of the hypnic jerk.  (A short YouTube video is included with the online article.)

 

SOURCE

Time, December 4, 2017, by Kate Samuelson

 

LINK TO RESOURCE

https://time.com/5008693/sleep-start-hypnic-jerk/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=time-health&utm_content=20200221

 

(Tiny URL)  https://tinyurl.com/y6xbkl6g

 

================================================

CLASS DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

•First discuss the normal circadian wake-sleep cycle.

•What is the usual pattern of REM sleep within the sleep cycle?  What typically occurs during REM sleep?

•What is a parasomnia?  List a few of the most common.

•What is “exploding head syndrome?” What are the causes, symptoms, and possible treatments?

•What is a “hypnic sleep jerk?”  What are the causes, symptoms, and possible treatments?

•What is hypothesized regarding the causes of an increase in insomnia and bad dreams during this period of lockdown during the covid virus?

 

Posted by & filed under Psychology Update.

WELCOME STATEMENT

Welcome to  Introductory Psychology Weekly Updates

Every Monday you will find wonderful resources to enhance your teaching and to engage your students in discussions.   With each “published” edition, you will discover two or three interesting provocative articles to use as “triggers” to discuss important issues that relate to your teaching content, subject matter, and/or important issues.  The choice of the articles is such that students can find these on popular sites such as the New York Times, Time Magazine, Huffington Post, and read them without the pressure of going to the library or poring through their textbook.  The popular media choices are easy to find without the need for subscription services; these are often articles that you might have read and brought up in your class.   Further, the update will include a few questions that can be used to get a discussion started.

In addition to a listing of the articles, you will also be presented with a few websites for use in your teaching.  The websites can be useful informative resources for both your teaching preparation and for  student use.  Lastly, every week, you will find either an App Of The Week listing, occasionally YouTube video, or a Podcast that will both enhance your teaching and presentations.   If you have any suggestions please contact me.

Thank you,

David Berg

[email protected]

 

=================

THIS WEEK’S PSYCHOLOGY UPDATE FOCUSES ON CAREERS IN PSYCHOLOGY

 

(These articles will help the professor and student fulfill APA guidelines for teaching and learning about the field of Psychology.)

 

ARTICLE #1

TITLE

Psych Careers

 

DESCRIPTION

All About Psych Careers is a fabulous resource for learning all about careers in Psychology and related fields.  It lists numerous articles related to specific careers as well as articles about study in graduate training.   This is a useful resource when covering the APA goals and objectives in all Psychology classes that focus and discuss career issues.

 

SOURCE

Psychology Today

 

LINK TO RESOURCE

https://www.psychologytoday.com/basics/psych-careers

(Tiny URL)  https://tinyurl.com/k9vc8mp

 

=================

 

ARTICLE #2

TITLE

Careers in Psychology

 

DESCRIPTION

This resource is the American Psychological Associations guide to careers in the field.  An excellent resource to answer many students’ questions regarding the field.  There are highlights in the listing for students of color and minorities who wish to get into one of the subfields of Psychology.  It is an excellent source for teaching the APA objectives and goals related to careers.

 

SOURCE

American Psychological Association

LINK TO RESOURCE

 

 

https://www.apa.org/education-career/guide/careers

=================

 

ARTICLE #3

TITLE

School Psychologist Overview

 

DESCRIPTION

This resource specifically focuses on the applied career of School Psychology.  Often students have heard of and even been tested but do not fully understand how the field is an important application of Psychology.   This US News & World Report realistically details the career, training, work, salary, and precisely how school Psychologists function.  It is an excellent resource to have ready when students ask about the field.

 

SOURCE

US News & World Reports

 

LINK TO RESOURCE

http://money.usnews.com/careers/best-jobs/school-psychologist

(Tiny URL)  https://tinyurl.com/jqbmyws

 

 

CLASS DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

•As part of a general discussion, focus on the different types of careers in Psychology.

•Basic Question:  What do Psychologists do?

•What do School Psychologists do?  How is this branch/subfield of Psychology different than others in the application of Psychological principles and research?

•Build the discussion on careers in Psychology as part of the course and curriculum program learning objectives.

Posted by & filed under Introduction To Psychology, Psychological Disorders and Therapy, Psychology Update, Sensation and Perception, States of Consciousness & Sleep, Stress and Health Psychology.

THIS WEEK’S PSYCHOLOGY UPDATE FOCUSES ON THE USES OF VIRTUAL REALITY (VR) AS A TECHNOLOGY TOOL USED FOR TREATMENT OF VARIOUS TYPES OF CONDITIONS.  BELOW YOU WILL FIND A LISTING OF ARTICLE TITLES, WEBSITES, AND YOUTUBE LINKS FOR VARIOUS USES OF VIRTUAL REALITY IN THERAPY.

THE REFERENCES CAN SERVE AS A STARTING POINT FOR STUDENTS INTERESTED IN THE APPLICATION OF VR TO THE FIELD OF THERAPY.

—->GETTING STARTED

Provided here are resources for understanding and utilizing VR for Psychology in terms of therapeutic resources.  Virtual Reality applications provide a new technology to handle a variety of problems.

For the student, all that is need is a cell phone, VR headset, and a source (such as those listed here).  As far as the headset is concerned these can be found all over the internet starting around $5 for the Google cardboard version.  Searching Amazon (no conflict of interest) will provide a great many VR headset alternatives; click on the filter for prices “low to high” to find the least expensive.  

For the professor:  this will make for a great DIY project for class.

 

VARIOUS  SOURCES FOR VR USE IN THERAPY

—->A VIRTUAL CURE (APA)

http://www.apa.org/monitor/julaug05/cure.aspx

 

—->Speaking of Psychology: Improving lives through virtual reality therapy (Episode 19) (APA)

http://www.apa.org/research/action/speaking-of-psychology/virtual-reality.aspx

 

—-> Virtual Reality as Therapy for Pain

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/29/well/live/virtual-reality-as-therapy-for-pain.html

 

—-> A Virtual-Reality Program to Conquer the Fear of Public Speaking

https://www.newyorker.com/culture/culture-desk/a-virtual-reality-program-to-conquer-the-fear-of-public-speaking

 

—-> How Virtual Reality Could Transform Mental Health Treatment

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/know-your-mind/201605/how-virtual-reality-could-transform-mental-health-treatment

 

—-> Treating PTSD With Virtual Reality Therapy: A Way to Heal Trauma (Video)

http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/treating-ptsd-virtual-reality-therapy-heal-trauma/story?id=38742665

 

—-> Using Augmented Reality to Treat Phobias

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/3209313_Using_Augmented_Reality_to_Treat_Phobias

 

—-> How Virtual Reality May Reduce Fear And Anxiety In Adults With Autism

https://www.forbes.com/sites/robertglatter/2019/02/25/how-virtual-reality-may-reduce-fear-and-anxiety-in-adults-with-autism/#59b6214677b1

 

 

VIRTUAL REALITY IN THE CREATIVE ARTS THERAPY FIELD

ART THERAPY

—->The Principles of Art Therapy in Virtual Reality

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpsyg.2018.02082/full

 

DANCE/MOVEMENT THERAPY

—->(PDF) Role of Virtual Reality for Cerebral Palsy Management

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/262075602_Role_of_Virtual_Reality_for_Cerebral_Palsy_Management

 

—->Upbeat: Augmented Reality-Guided Dancing for Prosthetic Rehabilitation of Upper Limb Amputees

https://www.hindawi.com/journals/jhe/2019/2163705/

 

 

MUSIC THERAPY

—->Virtual Reality And Music Therapy Are Helping Quadriplegics To Breathe Easy

https://www.huffingtonpost.com.au/2016/11/15/virtual-reality-and-music-therapy-are-helping-quadriplegics-to-b_a_21606117/

 

—->Atlanta Tech Edge: Bringing together Virtual Reality and Music Therapy  (YouTube Video — VR segment at 30 seconds)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rRP0Dynu_tQ