Posted by & filed under Introduction To Psychology, Personality, Psychology Update, Sensation and Perception.

TITLE

Vocal Cords: Why Do I Hate the Sound of My Own Voice?

 

DESCRIPTION

When you speak, do you hear your voice as others hear it?  When a person’s voice is played from a recording, most likely not, and as it turns out many are either upset, disappointed, and may not even recognize that it is their own voice.  This article explains the reasons: 
“When you hear people talking, sound waves travel through the air and into your ears, vibrating your ear drums. Your brain then transforms those vibrations into sound.  However, when you’re the one talking, your vocal cords and airways also vibrate. That means that you receive two sources of sound: the sound waves that travel into your ears from your own voice, as well as vocal cord vibrations.“When we talk, it’s like everyone hears the sound through speakers, but we’re hearing it through a cave complex inside our own heads,” says Martin Birchall, professor of laryngology (the study of the larynx, or voice box) at University College London. “The sound is going around our sinuses, all the empty spaces in our heads and the middle part of our ears, which changes the way we hear sounds compared to what other people hear.“  This can be an issue for some who either do not like their own voice, wish that it were different (for reasons such as actors), or for those who might have gender dysmorphia.  The article points out that there are voice therapist (voice physiotherapy) to change the sound.  Also, for those for whom it can be a mental health issue, there are train psychologists who can work with this type of issue.

 

SOURCE

Time, June 16, 2017, by Kate Samuelson

 

LINK TO RESOURCE

https://time.com/4820247/voice-vocal-cords/?utm_medium=email&utm_source=sfmc&utm_campaign=newsletter+health-tuesday+default+ac&utm_content=+++20220823+++body&et_rid=207786296&lctg=207786296

 

(Tiny URL)  https://tinyurl.com/mwm2vf8t

 

CLASS DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:

•In terms of the psychology of sensation and perception:  how do we hear other people’s voices that differs from hearing our own voice?

•And vice versa:  In terms of the psychology of sensation and perception:  how do we hear our own voice that differs from  hearing another person’s voice?

•Why is this an issue for some individuals?  Can anything be done?

 

 

Posted by & filed under Introduction To Psychology, Psychology App of the Week, Psychology Resource of the Week, Psychology Update.

PSYCHOLOGY APP OF THE WEEK

NAME

Popplet Lite

ICON 

 

 

 

iOS:  (free)

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/popplet-lite/id364738549?mt=8

CHROMEBOOK and Web:  https://www.popplet.com

 

DESCRIPTION

From the iTunes Store

Popplet is the simplest tool to capture and organize your ideas. With Popplet you can quick jot down your ideas and sort them visually. 

Apple has featured us in “Tools for Teachers”, “New and Noteworthy”, “What’s Hot” and “Get Stuff Done” 

Popplet is great for school and for learning in the classroom and at home. Students use Popplet to think and learn visually. By capturing facts, thoughts, and images, students learn to create relationships between them and generate new ideas. 

Popplet is also great for work and for generating ideas in the office or on the go. Professionals use Popplet to generate ideas and plan projects. By brainstorming visually or jotting down notes, Popplet helps professionals organize their thoughts and generate their next big idea.

This is the LITE version of Popplet. Popplet Lite will be free forever, but is limited to just one popplet. The full version of Popplet lets you create an unlimited number of local Popplet boards on your iPhone or iPad. 


People use Popplet to: 

+ Study: School Projects, Class Notes

+ Explore Ideas: Brainstorming, Mindmapping

+ Plan Projects: Diagrams, Process Charts 

+ Collect Inspiration: Mood Boards, Scrapbook, Travel Plans

Key Features of Lite:

+ One Popplet board

+ Capture notes in text

+ Capture notes with images

+ Capture notes with a drawing tool

+ Change the color of your notes and Popplet board

+ Link notes to each other visually

+ Export as PDF as JPEG

+ Pinch to zoom and expand

+ Multi Language Support

If you like Popplet after trying this LITE version, please download the ‘full’ version and you will also get:

+ Unlimited local boards 

+ See the Popplet boards of other users through the ‘Public’ tab to get inspired 

 

Posted by & filed under Careers, Careers in Psychology, Introduction To Psychology, Motivation and Emotion, Psychology Resource of the Week, Psychology Update.

TITLE

How to Set Goals You’ll Actually Achieve

 

DESCRIPTION

As a student: YOU REALLY WANT TO READ THIS ARTICLE!   This is a clear important article about setting goals to be successful in your endeavors.  “Whether you want to run a marathon, eat more healthfully or just get off the couch a little more, “for the majority of people, setting a goal is one of the most useful behavior change mechanisms for enhancing performance,” says Frank Smoll, professor of psychology at the University of Washington. “It’s highly individual,” he says—there’s no one way to achieve a goal. But these goal-setting strategies will help you stay the course.”  The article takes the reader through the simple necessary steps to both setting and reaching a desired goal.  Psychologists who study self-motivation and who work in coaching as a career have studied the necessary steps to achieve one’s goals.    This is the field of Applied Psychology.

 

SOURCE

Time, January 4, 2021,  by Amanda Loudin

 

LINK TO RESOURCE

https://time.com/5909923/how-to-set-goals/?utm_medium=email&utm_source=sfmc&utm_campaign=newsletter+health-tuesday+default+ac&utm_content=+++20211228+++body&et_rid=32502797&lctg=32502797undefined

 

(Tiny URL)  https://tinyurl.com/mr2jzp46

 

CLASS DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:

•After reading the article:  What is a product goal?  What is a process goal?

•Why does the article recommend working with a mentor or a partner help in achieving realistic goals?

•Suppose you major in Psychology and decide on a career in “coaching” — that is working with students who are having issues achieving their goals.  Based on your reading of the article, what advice would you give on how to achieve their goals and better grades?

 

Posted by & filed under Careers, Introduction To Psychology, Professional Organization, Psychology Update, Psychology Website of the Week.

PSYCHOLOGY WEBSITE OF THE WEEK

 

APS:  Association for Psychological Science

 

 

URL      

https://www.psychologicalscience.org/news

 

DESCRIPTION

“APS is the premiere international organization solely dedicated to the advancement of psychological science. APS works diligently to increase support for psychological research and to promote the use of science-based psychology in the development of public policy.”

The APS site provides a wealth of information about the field that will prove invaluable to teaching (“teaching tips”) and for Psychology majors.  The Teaching Page will provide professors at all levels with a treasure trove of teaching resource

Posted by & filed under Brain Structure and Function, Cognitive Psychology, Introduction To Psychology, Lifespan Development, Nervous System, Psychological Disorders and Therapy, Psychology Update, Stress and Health Psychology, Thinking, Language, and Intelligence.

TITLE

When Dementia Strikes at an Early Age

 

DESCRIPTION

Most of us expect that as we get older (beyond our 60s, 70s, 80s) there will be issues with cognitive abilities such as memory as well as physical problems as well. We learn more everyday about medical diagnoses such as dementia, Alzheimer’s Disease, and Parkinson’s.   However there are a number of serious disorders that can occur due to disease and brain injury that cause problems in early and midlife stages of our development.  “Young-onset dementia is a particularly disheartening diagnosis because it affects individuals in the prime years,” Dr. David S. Knopman, a neurologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., wrote in a July 2021 editorial in JAMA Neurology. Many of the afflicted are in their 40s and 50s, midcareer, hardly ready to retire and perhaps still raising a family.  Dementia in a younger adult is especially traumatic and challenging for families to acknowledge, and many practicing physicians fail to recognize it or even suspect it may be an underlying cause of symptoms.”  These  early onset problems are listed as:  vascular dementia, frontotemporal dementia, Lewy body disease (think of Robin Williams), early onset Alzheimer’s Disease, as well as brain injury (soccer, football, boxing) as well as other serious aging processes.  The article explains the symptoms and how each of the disorders adversely affects the brain.

This article is a great source for psychology students who study the neurobiological basis of behavior, abnormal psychology, and aging.  Psychologists are always part of the treatment teams for these serious disorders. 

 

SOURCE

New York Times, January 17, 2022, by Jane E. Brody

 

LINK TO RESOURCE

(Tiny URL)  https://tinyurl.com/ek29y9vx

 

CLASS DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:

•How does early onset dementia create a different type of crisis than late onset dementia?

•What are the characteristics and symptoms of the early onset of the disorders and diseases listed in the article?

•What is the concern regarding sports such as soccer, football, and boxing?  What measure can be taken to prevent brain injuries?

•How would a Psychologist fit in with the treatment team for an individual experiencing early onset dementia?

 

Posted by & filed under Introduction To Psychology, Lecture Enhancement/Student Engagement, Psychology App of the Week, Psychology Resource of the Week.

PSYCHOLOGY APP OF THE WEEK

Pocket: save articles, videos, and more to view later


Pocket

 

CLICK ON YOUR PLATFORM (free):     iOS      or    Android

DESCRIPTION

From Google Play Store and iTunes Store

Save articles, videos and other web content for later in a beautiful and optimized easy-to-view experience for your phone and tablet — even offline.

Pocket is your perfect mobile companion for commutes, travel, or curling up on your couch.

★ Webby Award for Best Productivity App and Best User Experience 2014 ★

• Unlimited storage to keep all the articles and videos you save in one place.
• 3 full-screen reading modes for Day and Night.
• Save data with wi-fi only syncing.
• Organize easily with powerful search and tagging.
• Works with your favorite apps and sites like Twitter, Flipboard, Feedly and more.
• Easily share anything from Pocket to Evernote, Twitter, Facebook or a Friend.
• Desktop Browser extensions for Chrome, Safari, Firefox and Internet Explorer lets you save anything from your Desktop to your Phone and Tablet in a one click. Available at http://getpocket.com/welcome


Learn more about us at http://www.getpocket.com/

Posted by & filed under Introduction To Psychology, Lecture Enhancement/Student Engagement, Psychology Resource of the Week, Psychology Update, Psychology Website of the Week.

PSYCHOLOGY WEBSITE OF THE WEEK

Pocket: save articles, videos, and more to view later

https://getpocket.com

(Also available as an app for both iPhone/iPad/Android devices)

DESCRIPTION

Save articles, videos and other web content for later in a beautiful and optimized easy-to-view experience for your phone and tablet — even offline.

Pocket is your perfect mobile companion for commutes, travel, or curling up on your couch.

★ Webby Award for Best Productivity App and Best User Experience 2014 ★

• Unlimited storage to keep all the articles and videos you save in one place.

• 3 full-screen reading modes for Day and Night.

• Save data with wi-fi only syncing.

• Organize easily with powerful search and tagging.

• Works with your favorite apps and sites like Twitter, Flipboard, Feedly and more.

• Easily share anything from Pocket to Evernote, Twitter, Facebook or a Friend.

• Desktop Browser extensions for Chrome, Safari, Firefox and Internet Explorer lets you save anything from your Desktop to your Phone and Tablet in a one click. Available at http://getpocket.com/welcome

Posted by & filed under Brain Structure and Function, Cognitive Psychology, Introduction To Psychology, Nervous System, Psychology Update, Stress and Health Psychology.

TITLE

Alzheimer’s researchers are looking beyond plaques and tangles for new treatments

 

DESCRIPTION

Psychologists and Neuroscientists have long been studying dementia and particularly Alzheimer’s disease.  While there have been strides to understanding how the disease effects the brain, there is yet an incomplete understanding.  Now research has uncovered some interesting new data which may lead to treatments.

From the article:

“The field of Alzheimer’s research is branching out.

After decades of focusing on the sticky amyloid plaques and tangled tau fibers associated with the disease, brain researchers are searching for other potential causes of impaired memory and thinking.

That search is on full display this week at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference (active link) in San Diego, where sessions are exploring factors including genes, brain injury, clogged arteries and inflammation.

A group of researchers from Seattle even unveiled a highly detailed atlas (active link) showing how different types of brain cells change in Alzheimer’s. The goal is to help scientists identify new approaches to treatment.”

The article  discusses the new findings and the hope for “new approaches to treatment.”  This is an excellent article to understand the applications of neuroscience.

 

SOURCE

NPR, August 1, 2022, by Jon Hamilton 

(NPR Morning Edition: Essay and audio of the broadcast — 3 minutes)

 

LINK TO RESOURCE

https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2022/08/01/1113825311/alzheimers-researchers-are-looking-beyond-plaques-and-tangles-for-new-treatments

 

(Tiny URL)  https://tinyurl.com/yztcux6k

 

CLASS DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:

•First:  what is Alzheimer’s Disease?  How does it affect the brain?  What are the behavioral symptoms?

•How do the current data and findings demonstrate that the existing theories of Alzheimer’s Disease  (“sticky amyloid plaques and tangled tau fibers”) do not adequately explain how the brain is damaged?

•What are the findings of the new research in regard to the possible causes and subsequent treatment for Alzheimer’s Disease?

•What role can Psychologists play in the research and treatment of Alzheimer’s Disease?

Disease, Dementia, Causes of Alzheimer’s Disease, Treatment for Alzheimer’s Disease

Posted by & filed under Cognitive Psychology, Introduction To Psychology, Motivation and Emotion, Psychology Update.

TITLE

Does Listening to Music Stimulate Creative Thinking, or Stifle It?

DESCRIPTION

A number of fascinating studies examines the use of listening to music during creative and problem solving tasks.  The results appear to be contradictory in the sense that the type of task and type of music may either be enhancing handling a task or deleterious. 

 “Listening to music while you work “significantly impairs” creativity. That was the conclusion of a study published earlier this year in the journal Applied Cognitive Psychology that examined the effect of different types of background music on creative problem solving.

For the study, UK researchers presented people with a series of word puzzles designed to measure creativity and “insight-based” processes. The study participants completed the puzzles either in a quiet space or in one with music playing in the background. Whether that music was familiar or unfamiliar, vocal or strictly instrumental, people’s scores on average fell on the creativity test compared to their scores in the quiet condition. “The findings challenge the view that background music enhances creativity,” the study authors wrote.”

So does this mean that students shouldn’t listen to music while they work or are there other factors to consider:   Another study contradicts and points out:  “But don’t pitch your headphones or desk speaker just yet. More research on music and creativity has found that, depending on the kind of creative task a person is grappling with, certain types of music may be helpful.”  A 2017 study in the journal PLOS ONE found that listening to “happy” music—defined as classical tunes that were upbeat and stimulating—helped people perform better on tasks that involved “divergent” thinking, which is a core component of creativity. Divergent thinking involves “making unexpected combinations, recognizing links among remote associates, or transforming information into unexpected forms, the authors of that study wrote. Basically, divergent thinking is coming up with new, outside-the-box ideas or strategies.“  Read more about the studies and the conditions under which the studies were conducted.

Consider whether music enhances your work or somehow interferes.

 

SOURCE

Time, July 16, 2019, by Markham Heid

 

LINK TO RESOURCE

https://time.com/5626958/music-creative-thinking/

 

(Tiny URL)  https://tinyurl.com/2ee8xev4

 

CLASS DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:

•Cite the study that demonstrates that listening to music interferes with the creative process.  What are the various conditions that are used to explain these findings?

•Cite the study that demonstrates that listening to music enhances the creative process.  What are the various conditions that are used to explain these findings?

•As Psychology students, how are we to understand the differences between the various studies?  Carefully look at the conditions how how the studies are conducted, the types of problems examined, and the types of results  found by the studies.   

•What conclusions would you draw from the studies, and if giving advice to new students at a college orientation, what would you tell them about listening to music and studying?

 

Posted by & filed under Child Development, Introduction To Psychology, Personality, Psychological Disorders and Therapy, Psychology Update.

TITLE

Too Much Screen Time for Teens Leads to Mental Disorders, New Study Shows

 

DESCRIPTION

This is a great article that will help the reader understand the effects of too much screen time on behavior.   The article states;  “Youngsters who spend a lot of time in front of a screen are at greater risk of developing behavior disorders, warned a new study.  Social media is thought to have an especially strong influence and was most likely to be linked to issues such as shoplifting, scientists said.  Watching videos and television, playing games, and texting were linked with oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), according to the findings published July 26 in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.  Examples of conduct disorder include bullying, vandalism and stealing while people with oppositional defiant disorder get in angry or irritable moods and show argumentative or defiant behavior, and vindictiveness.”  The article is great for a scientific understanding of how the research is completed.  The article clearly describes one of several studies and how it was conducted.  It is useful as a resource for both the understanding of the effects of screen time as well as how to conduct a scientific study.

 

SOURCE

Newsweek, August 1, 2022, by Darko Manevski

 

LINK TO RESOURCE

https://www.newsweek.com/too-much-screen-time-teens-leads-mental-disorders-new-study-shows-1729648

 

(Tiny URL)  https://tinyurl.com/yckkhnwk

 

CLASS DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:

•First:  what is considered “too much” screen time for children and teens?

•How were the various studies conducted?  Can you parse out the independent and dependent variables?

•What are the conclusions of the various studies on the problems that “too much” screen time can cause and exacerbate behaviorally?