Posted by & filed under Careers in Psychology, Introduction To Psychology, Nervous System, Psychology Update, Stress and Health Psychology.

TITLE

How Psychologists Can Help Treat Chronic Pain

 

DESCRIPTION

This is an extremely important article regarding chronic pain!  The article points out that pain-killing medications have serious problems and side effects and do not always take care of the problem.  As it turns out, pain treatment programs can offer long term relief working as well as or better than opioid medications.  “Psychologists, therapists and social workers have quietly become a crucial part of pain treatment programs, proving to be as effective or more so than medication. In 2018, the medical journal The Lancet went so far as to recommend education and psychological treatment as first-line interventions for chronic low back pain, before pharmacological treatment.”  The article provides details of research and various programs that will genuinely help with chronic pain issues.  The article also provides links to online pain management (without medications) programs and recommendations for types of therapists.

Students interested in this type of Psychology, should look into training programs in order to become practitioners of pain management.

 

SOURCE

New York Times, November 9, 2021,  By Sushma Subramanian

LINK TO RESOURCE

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/11/09/well/mind/psychologists-chronic-pain-therapy.html?smid=em-share

 

(Tiny URL)  https://tinyurl.com/23eze376

 

CLASS DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:

•Generally, what are the problems of using opioids for the treatment of chronic pain?

•What does a pain Psychologist do?

•Discuss the various non-medication types of programs to treat chronic pain?

•Would you consider a career as a specialist treating chronic pain clients?

 

Posted by & filed under Careers, Personality, Psychological Disorders and Therapy, Psychology Update, Stress and Health Psychology.

TITLE

Treating Bipolar 1 and Bipolar 2 Disorders

 

DESCRIPTION

This is an extremely important and comprehensive article regarding Bipolar 1 and Bipolar 2 disorders.  “In both conditions, a patient may experience episodes of major depression,” but they also “have mood states on the other end of the pole. If depression is considered ‘down,’ they have periods that are considered ‘up’ relative to normal mood.”  The article first provides the characteristic symptoms of each of the disorders and then a comparison of the differences that lead to a differential diagnosis.  Further the article discusses treatment by psychotherapy and medications.

This article should definitely be used as an adjunct to the abnormal/psychopathology and therapy chapters

 

SOURCE

U.S. News and World Reports, July 26, 2021, by  Elaine K. Howley

 

LINK TO RESOURCE

https://health.usnews.com/conditions/articles/mental-health/bipolar/bipolar-1-vs-2

 

(Tiny URL)  https://tinyurl.com/3nxdtt77

 

CLASS DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:

•What are the characteristics and symptoms of Bipolar 1 disorder?

•What are the characteristics and symptoms of Bipolar 2 disorder?

•How are the two disorders differentiated for diagnostic purposes?

•What are the treatments for Bipolar disorder?

 

Posted by & filed under Brain Structure and Function, Lifespan Development, Memory, Psychological Disorders and Therapy, Psychology App of the Week, Stress and Health Psychology.

PSYCHOLOGY APP OF THE WEEK

Alzheimer’s Disease Pocketcard

AlzheimersApp

 

Click on your platform:    iOS     or      Android

 

DESCRIPTION

From the Google Play and  iTunes Store

Manage Alzheimer’s disease with confidence. The Alzheimer’s Disease Pocketcard app helps physicians and other health care professionals care for patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) at the point of care. The app features clinically relevant information on AD and interactive tools to help clinicians efficiently assess patients and interview their caregivers.

Highlights

Top 10 signs of Alzheimer’s disease

The latest information on detection, diagnosis and management of Alzheimer’s disease, including pharmacotherapy guidelines and non-pharmacologic strategies

Interactive tools to assess cognition and function, including the Mini-Cog™, Clock Drawing Test, Saint Louis University Mental Status Exam (SLUMS), Functional Activities Questionnaire (FAQ) and more

• An Annual Wellness Visit algorithm developed by national experts to help clinicians assess cognition more efficiently
Current diagnostic criteria, including the DSM-5® and the updated diagnostic criteria and guidelines for Alzheimer’s disease from the National Institute on Aging and the Alzheimer’s Association

Education/support packets (PDF brochures) from the Alzheimer’s Association that can be e-mailed directly to patients and caregivers

Bookmarking and notes capability

Index and full text search

The Alzheimer’s Disease Pocketcard app is a collaboration between the Alzheimer’s Association and Borm Bruckmeier.

HOW TO USE THIS APP

This app can be used in conjunction with teaching both neuropsychology and aging.

Posted by & filed under Personality, Psychological Disorders and Therapy, Psychology Update, Stress and Health Psychology.

TITLE

If You’re Feeling Anxious, Try This 2,000-Year-Old, Neuroscience-Backed Hack

DESCRIPTION

This is truly a must read article for the understand of the concept of anxiety from historical, philosophical, and psychological perspectives.

From the article:  “Some 2,000 years ago, in the throes of a targeted chase to his death, a Roman philosopher named Seneca had a thought: “what’s the worst that can happen?” Today, a growing body of research finds that a Seneca inspired exercise—inviting the worried brain to literally envision its worst fears realized—is one of the most evidence-based treatments for anxiety. In scientific terms, that exercise is called imaginal exposure, or “facing the thing you’re most afraid of” by summoning it in your mind, says Dr. Regine Galanti, the founder of Long Island Behavioral Psychology, and a licensed clinical psychologist who regularly integrates imaginal exposure into her therapy.” The article explains both sides of anxiety:  the painful experience and the useful more positive use of the feelings.  Very importantly, the article highlights how our thoughts (worry) can create the intense unpleasant experience that we label as anxiety even when the event is not as subjectively negative as the anxious feelings.  The article discusses “imaginal” and exposure therapy as treatment components of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT).   

The article is an important read for students who want to understand anxiety and treatments.  Additionally the article can be used with text chapters on stress, health, and abnormal/psychopathology.

Note:  includes a brief video — worth watching

 

SOURCE

Time, November 5, 2021, by Julia Hotz

 

LINK TO RESOURCE

https://time.com/6114215/if-youre-feeling-anxious-try-this-2000-year-old-neuroscience-backed-hack/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=email-share-article&utm-term=health_mental-health

 

(Tiny URL)  https://tinyurl.com/s786pmh9

 

CLASS DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:

•According to the article, what is the historical and philosophical origins of the concept of anxiety?

•Why do some researchers state that there are positive aspects to anxiety?  Can anxiety be useful/helpful to an individual?

•How do “imaginal” and exposure therapies work to reduce the feelings of anxiety?

•Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is used as a main therapeutic practice to treat anxiety.  How does CBT help?

 

 

Posted by & filed under Introduction To Psychology, Personality, Psychology App of the Week.

PSYCHOLOGY APP OF THE WEEK

NAME

Profile Me – 

A quick Personality Test based on Research by Briggs and Myers

ICON

 

iOS:  (free)

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/profile-me-quick-personality/id702959840?mt=8

 

DESCRIPTION

From the iTunes Store

Profile Me is a very quick and simple personality test that will accurately determine your key personality traits…

“Profile Me” is based on the ‘Temperament Sorter’, which was designed by Dr. David Kersey, based on the research done by Isabel Myers and Kathryn Briggs, who developed the “Myers-Briggs Type Indicator”.

Through a simple test, which is made of multiple choice questions, “Profile Me” will determine your personality profile, by determining four dominant character traits. Each of these traits represents a dimension of:

••• Extraversion-Introversion,

••• Sensory-Intuitive,

••• Thinking-Feeling, and

••• Judging-Perceiving.

Knowing the dominant character traits will help determine the important characteristics of your personality profile.

“Profile Me” will give you detailed numerical scores that not only will help you determine your dominant personality traits, but also show ‘how dominant’ a certain dimension in your personality is. This will be very helpful in understanding your personality profile better. If some traits are not strongly dominant, you could have traits in common with more than one personality profile.

The application will also link you to another psychology application “Personalities and Behavior”, which is a great resource for reading more about your personality profile and other personality types, as well as learning more about a large, popular, and practical set of Psychology topics including personalities, behaviors, irrationality, motivation, intelligence, habits, and more.

The app also includes a number of learning resources and tools.

HOW TO USE THIS APP

 

To the Psychology Student:  This is a fascinating resource to learn about one of the most popular personality assessment instruments.

To the Professor:   Looking to engage students in the area of personality and testing?  This interesting app will be useful in guiding a discussion for involving students in the topic.

Posted by & filed under Psychology Update, Psychology Website of the Week.

PSYCHOLOGY WEBSITE OF THE WEEK

TITLE

Magination Press Family

URL      

https://www.maginationpressfamily.org

DESCRIPTION

From the website:

“Magination Press Family combines the expertise and resources of the American Psychological Association and its children’s book imprint, Magination Press. We’ve created these dedicated sites to provide accessible information for parents, educators, and other caregivers about managing stress and anxiety and promoting mindfulness in children and teens.”

Note:  This is a fabulous website of resources for students and families interested with working with children around Psychological Issues.

Posted by & filed under Careers, Careers in Psychology, Introduction To Psychology, Psychological Disorders and Therapy, Stress and Health Psychology.

TITLE

Working with adults with developmental disabilities

 

DESCRIPTION

This is a very important article from the American Psychological Association regarding the need for psychologists to be trained to work with individuals with developmental disabilities.  “There is a yawning gap between the need for and the availability of mental health services for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Here are some ways psychologists can help meet that demand.”  The article explains the various issues that individuals with disabilities have finding treatment with psychologists, and then also focuses on the issues that psychologists have in providing treatment that may include both training and funding.  The article also focuses on the types of therapy that psychologists can offer with the proper training.

Though complex, this is an excellent APA article for students contemplating the direction of their careers if interested in providing psychological services.

 

SOURCE

American Psychological Association, Monitor on Psychology, by Charlotte Huff, Volume 52 Number 8, November 1, 2021 

 

LINK TO RESOURCE

https://www.apa.org/monitor/2021/11/feature-developmental-disabilities

 

(Tiny URL)  https://tinyurl.com/e53n2jrw

 

CLASS DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:

•Specifically, what are developmental disabilities as defined by psychologists?

•After reading the article:  Why is there a “gap between the need for and the availability of mental health services for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities”?

•What are some of the issues faced by psychologists who might wish to work with individuals who have developmental disabilities?

•The article provides a few examples of treatments and therapies that psychologist could provide individuals who have mental health, intellectual, and developmental disabilities.  What are these?

 

Posted by & filed under Introduction To Psychology, Learning, Psychological Disorders and Therapy.

TITLE

Debate Rages After Woman Told to Remove ‘Distressing’ Spider Jewelry Over Worker’s Fears

 

DESCRIPTION

While this may seem like a silly article and a fun read, it illustrates the problems of those with intense fears and/or phobias which in this case is arachnophobia.  A worker wearing a piece of costume jewelry in the shape of a spider came under criticism from another worker who had an intense fear even though this was a decoration.  The article tells a bit more of the office story and how it unfolded.  “According to Medical News Today, some of the symptoms of arachnophobia are similar to those of a panic attack and include dizziness, nausea, sweating, shaking, increased heart rate, struggling to breathe and fainting.  To help deal with the phobia the site suggests exposure therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) or hypnotism.”

See the Psychology Updates (November 8, 2021) for which provide a more in-depth discussion of arachnophobia and the Phobys App for dealing with phobias.

 

SOURCE

Newsweek, October 18, 2021, by Lydia Veljanovski

 

LINK TO RESOURCE

https://www.newsweek.com/woman-remove-spider-brooch-colleague-phobia-debate-1639839

 

(Tiny URL)  https://tinyurl.com/9huz6sum

 

CLASS DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:

•What is arachnophobia?

•How did the situation evolve from one of personal decoration (jewelry) to a phobia trigger event?

•Suppose you were the psychologist called in a a consultant.  How would you explain how a piece of jewelry could become a fear stimulus? (a conditioning explanation) And further what therapeutic recommendations would you make for the individual who experiences the phobia?

 

Posted by & filed under Personality, Psychological Disorders and Therapy, Stress and Health Psychology.

TITLE

Anxiety Feels Terrible, But It Has an Upside. Here’s How to Make It Work in Your Favor

 

DESCRIPTION

This is a very fascinating article about the experience of anxiety in our daily lives.  “Anyone who’s experienced anxiety knows the distress it can bring. Often, this spiky emotion causes a racing heart, headache and knotted stomach. Frequently, we interpret these sensations as a danger sign. For instance, we might mistake social anxiety as evidence that everyone dislikes us or believe performance anxiety means we’re actually impostors.”  The article takes a different approach to anxiety to offer a perspective that recognizing it and other emotions can be a potentially positive experience.  “While anxiety certainly feels terrible, it does have an upside. In her new book, Good Anxiety, neuroscientist Wendy Suzuki repositions anxiety as a potentially positive force in our lives that can open the door to self-care and resilience—two things that inoculate us from stress. From this vantage point, social jitters might be a sign to reach out for support, while performance woes might be a signal to practice our craft a little more or spend two minutes in a power pose. When we realize anxiety can be a helpful messenger, we can make it work in ways that benefit our psychological well-being.”   Unlike other therapies, this particular perspective is based up “emotion-focused research.”   The article explains how focusing on the emotions through a series of techniques in psychotherapy can be positive and freeing for the individual.   The article can be read along with the chapters on emotion, health psychology, abnormal psychology and psychotherapy.

 

SOURCE

Time, October 28, 2021, by Hilary Jacobs Hendel and Juli Fraga

 

LINK TO RESOURCE

https://time.com/6111258/good-anxiety-therapists/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=email-share-article&utm-term=ideas_health

 

(Tiny URL)  https://tinyurl.com/v9cyjnzx

 

CLASS DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:

•How do individuals experience anxiety?  How is this considered a really terrible negative emotion for some individuals?

•According to the article, how can anxiety be used to change the negative emotions to a more useful emotion for the individual?

•What is the basis of “emotion-focus” in therapy? How does it work?

•According to the article, how would a person deal with conflicting feelings through this type of therapy?

TAGS

Emotion-Focused Therapy, Anxiety, Recognizing Emotions, Making Anxiety Work for Coping and Stress Management

Posted by & filed under Psychology Podcast of the Week.

PSYCHOLOGY PODCAST OF THE WEEK

 

TITLE

Forensic Psychology

Circle Of Insight Productions

 

 

URL      

https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/forensic-psychology/id1489897256

 

Tiny Url:  https://tinyurl.com/y5woz4u7

 

DESCRIPTION

From the website

“Dr. Carlos is an adjunct Professor in Forensic Psychology and Criminal psychopathology. He discusses concepts in the world of forensic psychology. He discusses legal issues pertaining to forensic psychology, psychology disorders, the criminal justice system and more.”

 

(Also see the Psychology Website of the Week (11/22/2021) related to the “insanity defense.”)